DHSVM

DHSVM

DHSVM (Distributed Hydrology Soil Vegetation Model) is a distributed hydrologic model that explicitly represents the effects of topography and vegetation on water fluxes through the landscape.

     For the scale and set of issues for the Rios Jucu and Santa Maria da Vitoria,  a higher resolution model is needed. DHSVM is a distributed hydrologic model that explicitly represents the effects of topography and vegetation on water fluxes through the landscape. Originally developed in the early 1990s (Wigmosta et al., 1994, 2002), the model code has been further developed by a group at the University of Washington and at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. 

DHSVM is typically applied at high spatial resolutions on the order of 100 m for watersheds of up to 104 km2 and at sub-daily timescales for multi-year simulations. It has been applied predominantly to mountainous watersheds in the Pacific Northwest in the United States, as well as in Southeast Asia, Hawaii, and the Amazon.

     DHSVM was originally designed for mountainous forested watersheds and is primarily a saturation excess flow model. Recently, however, Cuo et al. (2008) incorporated within DHSVM parameterizations appropriate to urban basins.   DHSVM represents physical processes such as the land surface energy balance, unsaturated soil moisture movement, saturation overland flow, snow melt and accumulation, and water table recharge and discharge. Using a digital elevation model (DEM) as a base map, DHSVM explicitly accounts for soil and vegetation types, and stream channel network and morphology. It simulates the routing of the runoff from each grid cell as streamflow along the stream network, using a triangular unit hydrograph and linearized St. Venant’s equations. That is, the stream-flow from each individual grid cell is routed separately to the basin outlet through the channel network. Because of this partitioning between models, the computation of runoff from the land surface is independent of any structures (e.g., dams) along the river channel.

     The detailed model description and code download can be found at the UW Land Surface Hydrology Group. The code is open-source, at no cost.